Friday, 9 September 2016

Lecanora soralifera





We will give examples of this,, first in Ingleton Parish churchyard, then in Settle Parish churchyard.

This pale grey - grey-green crustose lichens grows on acid rocks, such as "slate" tombstones, It also grows on the greywacke (a type of metamorphosed sandstone) which form many glacial eratics in our area

The thallus is divided into areoles. The areoles have soralia (minute patches with powdery soredia). - which are a lighter green than the rest of the areole. - See glossaries for definitions of these 
Glossary -  Last Dragon
Glossary - Irish Lichens

The first time I was shown this (thanks AP) on acid tombstone in Ingleton, a big effort was made to see whether the soralia (the minute powdery patches which house the powdery soredia) were at the centre of the aereoles or a the edge. L soralifera has them at the centre.
St Mary's Ingleton

Different year - same tombstone - St Mary's Ingleton









Settle. 




Go to this big block tombstone then look at the upright one just to the left of it




Look at the lichen on the top surface. There is some bluey grey (Porpidia tuberculosa) and some green grey - the Lecanora soralifera














Opegrapha gyrocarpa


Orange brown mosaic with black edges (like map lichen); "growing on vertical and slightly shaded base poor rocks surfaces: 









See this video of the tomb to the let of the block tomb marked with the arrow. eventually the video shows the block tomb stone with its Opegrapha gyrocarpa on the shaded vertical parts of the tomb




http://www.naturespot.org.uk/species/opegrapha-gyrocarpa



Wednesday, 7 September 2016

Psilolechia-lucida

Psilolechia-lucida is  sometime know as Sulphur dust lichen or 
Lemon-coloured Rock lichen.

Learn your Lichens Series
9. Porpidia tuberculosa
10. Psilolechia lucida 






To Quote Last Dragon:
Thallus a thin to granular, powdery, yellow-green to sulphur yellow crust, in places thicker and irregularly cracked; apothecia rare, very small, yellow-green to orange. Common throughout Britain, often in somewhat shaded situations, generally on base-poor rock,

Go to Settle Parish Church churchyard, to this big box tombstone. Then go to the gravestone to the left of it (not visible in this picture)






There is a little bit in a groove on the tombstone to the left -See below



Here seen close up:-







The Lichens in Churchyards Aidgap Leaflet has a picture of Psiloechia lucida at the beginning as an example of a lichen on an acid rock

Tuesday, 6 September 2016

Porpidia tuberculosa - Cigarette Ash Lichen

 Learn your Lichens 9 









Porpidia tuberculosa can form big grey (white-to pale blue grey) patches on acid rocks in church yards. Looking closely with a hand lens there are dark blue-grey almost silvery soredia. The edge of the thallus (the prothallus) is dark.


Here is is in Settle churchyard.

I spent hours going back to this tombstone hoping to photograph it in the sunlight.. but the trees to the south shaded it until the sun finally set behind the railway viaduct.


I'm calling this the "Big block grave". It has lots of Porpidai tuberculosa on its roof. 
The tombstone 3   along to the left has Porpidia tuberculosa too too.


Look at the top rim of the gravestone one to the left of the big block grave:


Here is the top rim of this gravestone
The lichen with the arrow is Lecanora soralifera. The one below it, next to the finger is Porpidia tuberculosa.






Here is a video of this tombstone (the one to left of the large block tombstone as at the top of this post)








Here it is in Ingleton, St Mary's Church 
Round the back of the church is a big colony on the church wall


 Porpidia tuberculosa. -  a very big patch. - below same species close up.










Learn your Lichens Series







Porpidia tuberculosa - Cigarette Ash Lichen

 Learn your Lichens 9 









Porpidia tuberculosa can form big grey (white-to pale blue grey) patches on acid rocks in church yards. Looking closely with a hand lens there are dark blue-grey almost silvery soredia. The edge of the thallus (the prothallus) is dark.


Here is is in Settle churchyard.

I spent hours going back to this tombstone hoping to photograph it in the sunlight.. but the trees to the south shaded it until the sun finally set behind the railway viaduct.




The tombstone 3 (actually 4)  along to the left has Porpidia tuberculosa too too.





Here it is in Ingleton, St Mary's Church 
Round the back of the church is a big colony on the church wall


 Could this be Porpidia tuberculosa? seems a very big patch. - below same species close up.









This video includes Porpidia tuberculosa










Learn your Lichens Series







Porpidia tuberculosa - Cigarette Ash Lichen

 Learn your Lichens 9 









Porpidia tuberculosa can form big grey (white-to pale blue grey) patches on acid rocks in church yards. Looking closely with a hand lens there are dark blue-grey almost silvery soredia. The edge of the thallus (the prothallus) is dark.


Here is is in Settle churchyard.

I spent hours going back to this tombstone hoping to photograph it in the sunlight.. but the trees to the south shaded it until the sun finally set behind the railway viaduct.




The tombstone 3 (actually 4)  along to the left has Porpidia tuberculosa too too.





Here it is in Ingleton, St Mary's Church 
Round the back of the church is a big colony on the church wall


 Could this be Porpidia tuberculosa? seems a very big patch. - below same species close up.




















Learn your Lichens Series







Sunday, 21 August 2016

YNU Meeting at Colt Park - incl - Klebsormidium crenulatum

The YNU Vice County 64 Field Meeting held at Ingleborough  on 20 August 2016 had weather designed to cancel out the three hot sunny days earlier in the week.


Actually the venue- Colt Park Barn - Natural England - was an excellent base. It meant that those who wanted to, could stay indoors in the afternoon, using microscopes if necessary, to look up details about the plants and animals we had found.

I even made a start at listing the mosses I had brought back in a bag... and was informed that the tiny woodlouse (c 4mm long) I had  found in my Philinotis fontana (moss) was in fact Trichoniscus pusillus the Common Soil Woodlouse, which is the commonest woodlouse in Britain. 
We (well Roger N) also found the Rosy Woodlouse Androniscus dentiger which is pink, up to 6mm long and is much less common and lives in lime rich conditions - from caves to brickwork.




Our group had restricted our botanical recording to a small area that had recently been fenced off to protect newly planted native trees beside a steep streamlet.    The thicker soil had Heather and Green-ribbed Sedge; other areas had calcareous flushes with Bird's-eye Primrose, Selaginella and Butterwort.


Klebsormidium crenulatum



On the return to the barn we passed through a gate at the top of the field. the wall there was made of sandstone.. and many of the stones had Klebsormidium crenulatum  -  the filamentous green alga that is increasing in Britain due to increased nitrogen oxides in the air. 







Saturday, 20 August 2016

Agrostis canina - Velvet Bent

Velvet Bent has a typical Agrostis "Christmas tree panicle with tiny spikelets", but the spikelets usually have awns  (Use a lens).  The leaves are narrow, usually less than 2mm wide, and the ligules are long and narrow. 

The emerging leaf is rolled and hairless (as in nearly all other Agrostis species)

Agrostis canina grows in damp/wet low nutrient places, - 
often with rushes.  

It has stolons with several shoots growing at each node- so the shoots and leaves are slender and tiny. With so many shoots and leaves growing close together it looks like velvet.


It is easier to observe this late in the summer, when the stolons with their side shoots have had time to grow.


A. canina at Thornton Ellers (Lower Derwent Valley NNR)
20 July 2016

A. canina at Thornton Ellers







Comparison with similar species:- 

Agrostis stolonifera also has stolons. It has one side shoot per stolon node, and its blades are usually greater than 2mm wide, whereas:
  Agrostis canina has several shoots per stolon node and the blades are less than 2mm wide.

A. canina at Straloch Moraine, Kindrogan July 2016,
growing amongst rushes.

Closer view

From my experience the panicles are often a little more  open than the extremely similar panicles of Agrostis vinealis.
However A vinealis has short rhizomes, with about 3 white scales on the rhizome before it turns upwards and forms a new  green leafy shoot.


Agrostis vinealis - Brown Bent

.

Thursday, 2 June 2016

Wild June 2106 - Day 2


2nd June: Resurfacing the road in Craven.

Well, watching them is an outside activity. And without roads we would find it much harder to access parts of the countryside. So well done to the men doing this hard work.








They "taped over the drain cover. then once the 
road tarrers had gone they peeled of the tape and revealed the cover,